Monday, 2 March 2009

Veg about... in the hot weather

Last year I shared with you my flourishing herb garden as a part of Bellgirl's Veg About. I'd just thought I'd like to update you on how my herbs are going during all of this crazy hot weather...

I had started pushing the native mint back a wee bit to make way for some kangaroo paws and correas, but then it just died right back all by itself in the heat. It has almost all died, in fact. Even though it looks really feral, cutting it back will prompt it to start growing again, and then die again in the next heat wave.

Native mint before...


...native mint after

We lost our oregano, but the parsley and thyme survived, although is looking a little spindly. Our regular mint pot is looking fine though, although a bit burnt at the bottom.


Herb pot before...


...and after! Uh oh! Oh well, it'll grow back.


Regular mint, looking happy as ever.

However, there are two plants that didn't bat an eyelid during this weather (although not veggies):

The ptilotus spathulatus, a perennial shrub native to Melbourne's western planes, and the asterolasia phebalioides, a rare native found in highly exposed, rocky/swampy areas of the Grampians. I bought another one and decided to see how it would go in the ground rather than potted. In fact, these plants thrived in the 40+ weather. I bought a second ptilotus (my first one is in a pot, see below) and royally cocked up planting it: I completely mashed the roots and it didn't get much watering, and two days after planting it was when the real heat wave hit. It dropped a few leaves, but then bounced right back within days. In a pot or in the ground, this plant is indestructible.




My two awesome indestructible plants!

4 comments:

Hoppo Bumpo said...

I'm glad its not just our plants that died back! Hooray for indestructibles ... I must investigate. Sounds just the thing for our garden!

Taccolina said...

Isn't that funny! Our thyme bush is thriving, ditto the lemon and lime trees -- too bad about pretty much everything else. Oh, except a native thing which name I need to look up that actually busted out new growth in that 43 degree week. What?!! Now it's flowering!

Melanie said...

My garden took a real hit and looks the worse for wear. My herbs didnt make it and I will have to start again. Glad some of yours survived. I put my chives and spring onions inside on my kitchen bench and have never had a better crop from them so it wasnt all bad.

snarkygurl said...

I can't grow regular chives, but I have a set of Chinese Chives (garlic chives) that will survive Texas droughts without any problem and no care. In fact, they have spread quite nicely and I use them in areas that kill off all my other plants. I wonder if they would work where you live.